Monthly Archives: June 2015

Happy Birthday Gilda

Outdoor space at Gilda's Club Twin Cities

Outdoor space at Gilda’s Club Twin Cities

What a difference a year makes!  Last year at this time I was just starting out as a volunteer at the newly opened Gilda’s Club Twin Cities.  I was blogging about my to-do list as I prepared for surgery.

This is where the Gilda Greeters sit welcoming folks into the clubhouse.  It's a perfect volunteer spot for me!

This is where the Gilda Greeters sit welcoming folks into the clubhouse. It’s a perfect volunteer spot for me!

Gilda’s Club, dedicated to the memory of Gilda Radner, is a welcoming community of support for anyone living with cancer, along with their families and friends.  It’s a place where everyone is welcome, where no one faces cancer alone.

This year when we went to the Gilda’s Club Friends and Family Birthday celebration I participated in most of the events.  Orion and I met some new friends, visited with old friends and enjoyed the Clubhouse atmosphere.  I spent much of the day on my feet, and didn’t think anything of it.

Our "Gilda Fairy" maintains the fairy garden where members can send notes to those who have passed.

Our “Gilda Fairy” maintains the fairy garden where members can send notes to those who have passed.

 

The Clubhouse is really settling into itself.  The gardens continue to expand, making lovely healing and meditative spots to just sit and enjoy the sunshine.  There is the fairy garden, the new waterfall and picnic area (the first photo was taken there) and the healing fountain and gardens.

Orion at the healing fountain with the gardens behind

Orion at the healing fountain with the gardens behind

Last year the healing fountain was dedicated and Orion and I made stones for people we knew who had dealt with cancer.  He made one for my Mom and I made some for friends I’ve lost to this pervasive disease.  This year, unfortunately, there were more stones.  Orion made one for me!

Our helpers in the kitchen often bring family along.

Our helpers in the kitchen often bring family along.

Inside the kitchen is often in use for classes or just the staff throwing something together for anyone who drops in.  I decorated cupcakes and made Orion eat one, poor thing.  I’ve attended several events in the kitchen this past year.  (What can I say, if there’s food I’m more likely to show up – even now!)

Orion did this one by himself.

Orion did this one by himself.

The Expressive Arts Studio often displays projects members have created.  That’s where we colored our stones for this year.  It’s a great place to work out feelings through art.  I’ve taken the Homemade Card Making class and had a lot of fun.

We were the first ones to arrive at drumming

We were the first ones to arrive at drumming

There was a lot of vibrational healing going on.  We got to do a gong meditation in the Mind Body Studio.    Orion and I also did some drumming in the Community Room.  He’s pretty excited to show off his new rhythms the next time he gets to a drumming circle.

We participated in some short improvisation workshops put on by the folks from Brave New Workshop. Jenni Lilledahl, one of the owners of Brave New Workshop is also one of the founders of Gilda’s Club Twin Cities.  It’s great to have their support.  The workshops were a lot of fun.

Here we are in 2014

Here we are in 2014

The biggest change though is when I compare the family portrait Orion and I took last year to the one we took this year.  My daughter was talking to old friends, catching up.  When they asked about me she told them I was genuinely happy.  Maybe I am.  I’m certainly grateful that so much has changed.

and here we are this year.  What a difference a year makes!

and here we are this year. What a difference a year makes!

.

.

.

.

.

I captioned last years blog with our "photo booth" pictures.  These year we got a little sillier

I captioned last years blog with our “photo booth” pictures. These year we got a little sillier

 

 

Charleston

01 Jan 2013, Charleston, South Carolina, USA --- Senior Pastor, Rev. Clementa Pinckney, speaks to those gathered during the Watch Night service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina December 31, 2012. New Year's Day 2013 was the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, which declared free all slaves in the rebellious states of the Civil War.The Watch Night tradition at black churches goes back to Freedom's Eve, on New Year's Eve 1862 when slaves, free blacks and abolitionists gathered in churches and homes to wait for the Emancipation Proclamation to take effect on January 1, 1863. REUTERS/Randall Hill (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION POLITICS) --- Image by © RANDALL HILL/Reuters/Corbis

Senior Pastor, Rev. Clementa Pinckney, 41– Image by © RANDALL HILL/Reuters/Corbis

I could choose to write about Father’s Day.  I’m not worried about my father getting shot just going through his day.  That’s Privilege.  I could choose to write about the Summer Solstice.  The longest day of the year when the sun shines, illuminating things.  Maybe I’ll just shine my light on a Difficult Topic, #BlackLivesMatter.

Tywanza Sanders 26 Graduate of  Allen University in Columbia, SC. with a degree in business administration.             (Anita Brewer Dantzler via AP)

Tywanza Sanders 26 Graduate of Allen University in Columbia, SC. with a degree in business administration. (Anita Brewer Dantzler via AP)

We are taught a very highly Edited version of history.   I had no idea how important the AME church was, historically, until Obama started talking about it.  I believe it is our personal responsibility to educate our selves on the things going on around us that the System would rather we ignore.  This is not an easy task.  It first requires an understanding that what we are taught isn’t the whole story.

Cynthia Hurd, 54 Hurd was a branch manager at the Charleston County Public Library.

Cynthia Hurd, 54
Hurd was a branch manager at the Charleston County Public Library.

The reason people who are educated in this area talk about systemic racism is because it is invisible and perpetuated by the system.  This is not a new thing.  I remember Kent State.  The first time the National Guard opened fire on campus?  No.  The first time a white upper middle class student was killed.  Yes.

Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, 45 Coleman-Singleton was a high school track coach at Charleston Southern University

Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, 45
Coleman-Singleton was a high school track coach at Charleston Southern University

I hear white people ask, “Why is it always about race?”   Because when you have to live with it every day, you begin to realize it is inescapable.  There is a reason that #BlackLivesMatter is not #AllLivesMatter.  It is not because all lives shouldn’t matter, but because it’s clear that Black lives don’t.

There is a difference between not actively perpetuating the problem and helping to solve it.  That difference starts with awareness.  The things that are so common it’s easy not to even notice are often referred to as microaggressions.

Myra Thompson, 59 The Church of the Holy Trinity, via its Facebook page, identified Thompson as the wife of Reverend Anthony Thompson, Vicar of Holy Trinity Reformed Episcopal Church in Charleston.

Myra Thompson, 59
Wife of Reverend Anthony Thompson, Vicar of Holy Trinity Reformed Episcopal Church in Charleston.

Learning to recognize these in ourselves,

in the media, and in others is a big step towards simply validating the problem.  Then the next step is to Speak Up.

Ethel Lee Lance, 70  (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Ethel Lee Lance, 70
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

I end where I started, encouraging self education.  Each of these links takes you to places where you can hear different voices, and perhaps learn more.  Additionally I recommend checking out my friend Crystal Blanton’s 30 Day Real Black History Challenge.  She’s been doing this for several years so check out her archives as well.

Rev. Daniel Simmons, 74

Rev. Daniel Simmons, 74

Crystal was instrumental in the editing of the anthology Bringing Race to the Table:Exploring Racism in the Pagan Community.  I have a small essay in that book, and I’m very proud to be a contributor.  I recommend it to non-Pagans as well.  The book is structured with a section on People of Color’s experiences, a section on History, and a section where ally’s speak.  I think the material is widely applicable and sometimes it’s easier to hear if you have a little distance.

Thank you for reading.

Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor, 49 Enrollment counselor at the Charleston campus of Southern Wesleyan University

Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor, 49
Enrollment counselor at the Charleston campus of Southern Wesleyan University

 

Susie Jackson, 87  (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Susie Jackson, 87
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

Photos from Huffington Post

Miss Minnie

There's always something going on in my neighborhood

There’s always something going on in my neighborhood

Those who are regular readers know that I have Karina staying with me unexpectedly this month.  With Karina comes her dog, Minnie.  There is a difference between “babysitting” for a weekend and having the dog come to live with you.  I’m learning a lot.

One of the things I find interesting is how much I struggle with Mom vs Grandma.  When I talk to Minnie about Karina, it’s Mom.  When I talk to Minnie about me I stumble.  I’ve still got Orion and I don’t have grandchildren (beyond the dog).   I think I’m ready to be a grandma. (I’m not sure I’m ready for Karina to be a mom, and with Orion all bets are off.)  But I clearly don’t think of myself that way.  I wonder how many other people struggle with the words during that transition?

FEED ME!

FEED ME!

The other part of that is “Whose the Boss?”.  Karina is gone, a lot.  I’m home, in my house.  On their own, Minnie would spend that time in her kennel.  Here, since I’m moving about, that’s just not fair.  So I have Minnie for much of the day, but she’s not my “responsibility”.  That might be fine if she was a plant.

As it is, Minnie and I are constantly interacting.  She wants to go out, her food bowl is empty, it’s hot and she needs water.  She wants to play, she wants to cuddle, she wants to jump into my lap and jump out and jump back in.  When I’m in the kitchen, or doing anything else, she’s under-foot.  Even when she’s quiet, her presence napping on the couch while I type makes the atmosphere different than when she’s not around.

Play?!?

Play?!?

This weekend Karina spent some time in her room binging on The Lord of the Rings movies.  Minnie, of course was with her.  It occurred to me more than once to look up and wonder about where the dog was, and what she was getting into.  I think I’ll miss them both when they go.

This morning I took Minnie for a walk.  She’d spent a lot of the time in the kennel this weekend.  She was really hyper and needed some exercise. It’s not my job to take the dog for a walk.  I spent a lot of time not doing anything productive this weekend.  I needed some exercise enough to notice that I hadn’t been getting any.  The fact of the matter is that the walk was for me, but I wouldn’t have taken it without the dog.

quiet is nice

quiet is nice

It’s probably good to be doing this transition with a puppy rather than a baby.  The “stepping on toes” doesn’t hurt quite as much this way.  If Minnie was a baby, Karina would want to know when, what and how much she was eating (and what was coming out the other end.)  Do I really have to tell her that I sneak Minnie bacon at breakfast?

 

Karina

Karina and I in NYC April 2015

Karina and I in NYC April 2015

Every year on their birthdays I write my kids a letter.  I don’t think either of them have ever seen them.  I’m not sure any of them are legible to a generation accustomed to typeface rather than sloppy cursive.  They are tucked away in baby books and old photo albums and who knows where around the house.

Since today is Karina’s birthday it seemed appropriate to write this year’s letter here.  The “photo essay” is for you guys, but the letter is for her.

Karina appreciated good food from an early age.

Karina appreciated good food from an early age.

6/8/2015

Dear Karina,

Wow!  This has been a year of unexpected changes and challenges for you.  You continue to impress and amaze me with your ability to maintain a level head and make good decisions in the face of adversity.

I started your year out with the challenge of my bariatric surgery.  Growing up with your brother, I know you have issues with spending time in the hospital.  Even so, you stepped up for me.  Your calm (eye rolling) reminders kept the surgeon from canceling the procedure all together.  You celebrated the outcome and assured me you knew it was going to be fine all along.

Her fearlessness and determination have always been evident.

Her fearlessness and determination have always been evident.

Only you would have found the best way to manage your time while I was in the hospital was to include walking the puppy with your visits.  You arranged to work through the system and get permission to bring Minnie in to visit.  It was a treat to see her (and you) and I’m sure it got me released faster.

You were so stressed you quit a job, which was a good decision.  It was definitely time to move on.  But I know it was hard for you to regroup and decide what you wanted to do next.  The ups and downs of early 20’s relationships didn’t make it easier.  I’m not sure I did either, but I always believed you’d figure it out.

She has an artistic bent that comes out in her cooking.

She has an artistic bent that comes out in her cooking.

Then you took on the family dynamic and held Christmas at your house.  Family holiday dinners are a huge undertaking for anyone.  Given your family, and all its extensions, the potential for disaster was huge.  You were determined.  Everyone would show up, feel welcomed, and have good food that suited their dietary needs.  It was impressive.  I know that post party feeling of exhaustion and wondering if it was worth it.  Now you know you really can do anything you set your mind to!

My having cancer and a second surgery threw you for a loop.  It didn’t help that you were just starting a new job, that looks like a perfect career move.  Again you managed to juggle all the pieces and perform above expectation.   Karina’s Korner was launched to rave reviews and I managed to attend my birthday dinner with very reasonable portion accommodations.

She makes the hard stuff look easy - even that awkward age!

She makes the hard stuff look easy – even that awkward age!

This last month has been yet another challenge with moving, and then having the apartment you were moving to fall through.  Most of the people I know would have spent a week crying under the covers.  You picked up, kept packing, arranged for a storage space and have already found a new, new apartment.  Chances are you’ll like this one better in the end.

This year begins for you with a fresh start.  You and Minnie will be settled into your new place before the end of the month.  You’ve left your 2nd job behind and moved to a full-time position in your career field.  Your creativity and management skills are being utilized and challenged in productive ways.  You are ready to shine.

I can’t tell you how proud and impressed I am by you this year.   You have an astounding resiliency.  You have learned a lot about yourself through these trials and have a new appreciation for your own independence.  Even when you’re hurting you are kind, and generous, and dependable.

I'm so grateful that she still enjoys spending time with me!

I’m so grateful that she still enjoys spending time with me!

I love you so much!  I only wish you the best for the coming year.  May all the hard work you’ve done bloom into joy and fulfillment.

Love,

Mom

 

Gardening

This is the "before".  I've talked about digging the strawberries out of the grass in previous blogs.

This is the “before”. I’ve talked about digging the strawberries out of the grass in previous blogs.

I skipped last week’s post.  I’d like to say it was because I was in the garden.  I was, some.  Memorial Day weekend for us is typically cool and rainy, and this was no exception.  It’s also a big gardening weekend.  The tomatoes go in, now that we’re “safely” past the frost.  We’ve got such a short season that delaying past Memorial Day means possibly no harvest.

This is the "after".  I've got a ring dug out.  Yes, those are squash - hopefully they'll keep the grass down once the strawberries are done for the season.

This is the “after”. I’ve got a ring dug out. Yes, those are squash – hopefully they’ll keep the grass down once the strawberries are done for the season.

This year Memorial Day was early and the season late.  I order my plants from a company in Oregon. (Hoping that they’ll be climate ready when they arrive, which isn’t true if I order from a company in New Mexico!)  I finally called them, seeing no sign of the plants “shipping date May 15th” I was wondering if they’d received my order!  Apparently they are having unseasonable weather along with the rest of the country.  The plants aren’t ready to be shipped.

I dug some of my containers out from under the grapevines.  You honestly couldn't even see them before (kind of like that mess in the background)

I dug some of my containers out from under the grapevines. You honestly couldn’t even see them before (kind of like that mess in the background)

Part of me appreciates the extra time.  I’ve made comments about recovering my gardens from years of neglect.  I won’t get it done this year, but I am making slow progress.  One of my Facebook friends commented that she wanted to see photos – so that’s what this post is really about.

Got a start on the wildflowers/butterfly garden.  The bergamot seems to be holding it's own, but the columbine needed some help.

Got a start on the wildflowers/butterfly garden. The bergamot seems to be holding it’s own, but the columbine needed some help.

Hopefully my plants will arrive soon and I’ll have tomatoes before September!

The peonies seem happy to have some breathing room!

The peonies seem happy to have some breathing room!

Onion and salad greens are starting to show and peas where the tomatoes ought to be.

Onion and salad greens are starting to show and peas where the tomatoes ought to be.

%d bloggers like this: