Social Media

I’ve been neglecting my blog.

Mom sitting in the sun (I’m reflected in the glass door)

There are a multitude of reasons for this, and even more excuses.  It’s summer, no one reads blogs in the summer.  I’ve been spending a lot of time up at my parent’s and they don’t have the internet.  I keep forgetting to take pictures.

The truth is that social media is a double-edged sword.  Addictive and depressing, narrowing the information bandwidth, and allowing us to pretend we’re connecting with people, creating an illusion of a network of friends.   At the same time it really does help keeping track of our loved ones at a distance.  It can be an efficient way to organize, or spread information.  It can be a meeting ground and a place to begin new, real, relationships.

Like most things, making social media work for us rather than against us requires work.  Hitting the like button and sharing the facebook generated and suggested birthday meme isn’t really work.  Counting how many “friends” you have and playing games across a social platform doesn’t build relationships.

My daughter (I got to hang with her friends for her birthday) doesn’t read my blog. Ever.

I have friends who read my blog.  I know this because they’ll comment, or call and ask for follow up.  (Or message me to alert me to a gramatical error.)  When I see them they’ll be fairly up to date on what’s been going on in my life.   I have friends who don’t read my blog.  They are surprised at old news and entirely unashamed when I comment that I talked about it on my blog.  (If you really wanted to keep up……)

I also have regular readers who feel like friends.  I’ve read their blogs, and made comments.  They’ve read my blog and made comments.  We have some things in common.  We keep track.  But it’s hard to read all the blogs and maintain all the long distance, never met you in person relationships.  Bloggers come and go, getting caught up in other aspects of their lives.

Orion is really good about liking and sharing my posts. But I suspect he just reads them to see what I’m saying about him. 🙂

I am truly grateful for all the people who take the time to check in.  I am delighted by the little likes and shares, and genuinely appreciate the support.  I am thrilled and if I’m honest intimidated by the comments.  I try to check in and respond back.  Sometimes it’s overwhelming.

Thank you for taking the time to participate in my social media outpourings.  Thank you for being that oddity that is an on-line friend.  Thank you for your likes, your shares, your comments, your patience, your continuing checking in and checking up on me.

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Memorial Day

National Cemetery at Fort Snelling MN

So many wars, so many lives.  Some were fought over an ideology, and won, and yet we still contest that ideology.  Some were fought over resources, because a desperate enough people will do anything to try and survive.  Most were fought because someone was afraid of losing something, and many who fought lost everything.

I have mixed feelings about this day.  I appreciate the sacrifice of those who have fought for my freedoms.  But I grew up during Vietnam.  I understand war to be instigated by the wealthy and powerful in order to protect their wealth and power and fought by the poor and less fortunate.   Give us your life, we’ll give you an education doesn’t sit well with me.

I know we did not do well by those who fought in Vietnam.  We, as a country, had yet to learn how to hate a war and still honor those who served.

Is it an honor to serve in a war that was lost?  I don’t believe might makes right.  Just because you win doesn’t mean you are more just, or moral, or worthy.  But, for example,  I struggle to honor those who lost their lives fighting on the losing side in our civil war.  Their families, though, certainly believe them to be honorable and do not want them forgotten.

Is any war really won?  WWII, a war that had a clear moral victory, the war fought by “the greatest generation” we won.  Today we can have Nazi’s marching in the streets and our president insisting they are good people.  Is that what those lives were sacrificed to achieve?

As a Wiccan I do work with ancestors.  When they talk about fighting the good fight they are not encouraging fisticuffs.  They generally have a broader view in death than they did in life and would like to broaden my view as well.  They encourage me to understand better and more fully.  They want me to speak and educate and ask for what I desire.  Sometimes that’s scary for me.  It’s rarely easy.

That fear, of finding out that we are wrong, of learning that there is more to a situation than we thought, of admitting we don’t know everything, that is, ultimately, why we have wars.  If it wasn’t so scary to find a better solution, we probably would.  If a better solution than giving up your life was available, wouldn’t you take it?

So honor the ancestors this Memorial Day.  Honor those who have given up their lives in service to this country.  Honor them by demanding we find a better way, a real win.

Take 2

This is the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Plant sale. Another gray day. But much more productive.

This is the third blog post I’m writing today.  The first one was lovely, until it wasn’t.   I started somewhere and ended up doing a writing catharsis exercise.  No one needs to read that.  Self indulgence happens sometimes.  It generates ideas sometimes.  It generates beautiful tortured poetry sometimes.  This time it needed to be put aside so I could move on.

Blog post number 2 was perfect.  I took my theme and ran with it.  I had photos all cropped and pasted just where I wanted them.  I had a message, love, family and all that.  I also somehow managed to create it as a page rather than a blog post.  I set it aside and ran off to a doctors appointment thinking I could fix it when I got back.  Nope.  Somehow I managed to erase all but the first and last sentence.  Irretrievable.

Mother’s Day at Eat Street Social. I didn’t think to pester the waiter to do it again after our surprise guests arrived.

So here I am again thinking it’s Monday after Mother’s Day and I really “should” put out something.  Orion promised me he was looking forward to reading what I wrote while he was at his day program.  Haha.  (I think he just wanted to see the photos he was in.)  But now I’m tired and crabby and the sun has disappeared behind the clouds.

In the post I lost I talked about gardening and spring and after I wrote it I was looking forward to getting my hands in the dirt this afternoon.  Given the sudden shift in the weather, and the fact I still have some writing to do, I don’t think that’s going to happen.

Some days just go like that.  Maybe the sun will come out tomorrow.

Lot’s of herbs and tomatoes, eggplant, squash, tomatillo and a begonia. I’ll get to it eventually, honest!

Some Assembly Required

I went to the car wash. Then I parked outside under a tree. Now I need to go again.

We went from 2 feet of snow to 85 degrees up here in Minnesota.  It’s crazy weather and has me behind in the yard.  I’m always behind in the yard, but this year that’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it.  The consensus up here is that it’s now summer and we had 1 beautiful day of spring.

Some of the season’s work isn’t actually in the yard at all.  I took a load to Goodwill.  I took my car to the car wash.  I’m trying to figure out what to do with all the “stuff” I’ve brought back from my parents house.  It’s not easy keeping motivated.

One day this weekend I threw my hands in the air and bought one of those outdoor storage benches.  I wanted to get the yard furniture cushions out of my dinning room.  I expected to shove a bin in the back of my car.  Silly me.  Instead it was a box, and directions.

This is before I realized it was supposed to be a 2 person job.

Apparently the current world view is that pictographs are much easier to follow than words.  That’s only true if you’re in translation with a bad editor, but hey.  I was more than half way through the project before I got to the step that said, this step requires 2 people.  I DON’T HAVE 2 PEOPLE!   But I am determined and managed despite having “inadequate tools” for the job.

I seem to be in the one step forward two steps back mode.  (I know, it’s supposed to go the other way around but it sure doesn’t feel like it.)  I did 5 minutes of trimming brush before I got wacked on the head with a buckthorn.   Little branch, hit me just right.  Thorn cut the skin, head wound, lots of bleeding but actually no big deal.  Still, it made me much less ambitious about the project.

Gardening is dangerous work!

I did give myself a reward by making a lovely dinner.  If only I could figure out how to use the grill….

Dinner was lovely though.

Charities

Anne is the Volunteer Coordinator at Gilda’s Club. Getting nametags ready for the Imagine a Place Breakfast

Many of you know that I do regular volunteer work for Gilda’s Club Twin Cities.   Gilda’s is a place where support, education, classes in healthy living, social support and community resources are made available to anyone impacted by cancer – for free.   That’s not just people with a cancer diagnosis, but their families and support systems.  It’s an incredible organization and a beautiful and healing environment.

Because Gilda’s does not demand anything of its members, it is supported entirely by community donations.  Our clubhouse is a gift of time, talent, and resources of many volunteers, community members and business organizations.  The position I occupy, Gilda Greeter, is a volunteer position that many of the group of Gilda greeters have been doing for years.  There is a lot of love at Gilda’s.

Last week was our big annual fundraiser.  The “Imagine a Place” Breakfast started to raise funds to create a clubhouse in our area.  Imagine a Place, our founders said, where people could go to get help and support.  We continue to imagine and to grow.  That takes a lot of time, a lot of hands, and honestly a lot of money.  I put in some extra hours last week to help out.

Girls night out, and we all got an I ATE sticker to support the Aliveness Project

The Aliveness Project has been around in the Twin Cities for a lot longer.  They are an organization that supports people who are living with HIV and AIDs.  They were one of the first groups that offered free testing.  They also provide education and support to their members.

I’ve not been as active with the Aliveness Project, although many of my friends have.  One of the best fundraisers they do is called Dining Out for Life.  Essentially, restaurants who participate donate a percentage of the days take to the Project.  It’s fun to make a date for a night out and know that because of the timing you are also supporting a good cause.

In all honesty, we didn’t plan our night out to happen along with Dining Out for Life.  (In spite of the fact that we were all aware it’s a thing.)  We didn’t pick the restaurant Northbound Smokehouse because it was one of the biggest supporters of the event (a platinum level participant).  We just got lucky.

We ordered big, ate really well, tipped generously and all threw a little something extra in the envelope the Dining Out volunteers provided.  We were happy, and grateful, to be enthusiastic participants.  It was fun, it was easy, and most especially it was a good cause.

Minnesota has one of the most active non-profit communities in the nation.  We have a council that reviews non-profits and provides information about how their money is distributed.  We have community events, generous business owners and an understanding that if those in need do better, we all do better.

How do you support your community?

Downsizing

This project required a dumpster, a truck, and 3 cars packed full of stuff to go.

I’ve been posting a little inconsistently because I’ve been spending a lot of weekends “up north” at my parent’s house.  As they age their needs have changed.  Mom is mostly using a walker to get around, even in the house.  She’s really needing a wheelchair if she’s out and about.

Literally could not take 1 step into this closet when we started. The stuff on the floor was piled 1/2 way up to the lower bar.

There was a big effort in March to get Mom a hospital bed to sleep in.  She can use the adjustability.  It will also help to have the grab bars just to roll over.  We acquired a bed from one of the relatives (in the next state over).  The logistics of getting the bed here and installed have been daunting.

The biggest dilemma in all of this has been space.  My parents hang on to everything.  As my Mom has lost track of what she has, she’s found the need to “replace” things that never were lost.  We’ve seen them using what we would call rags and bought new as well.  Then we discover the problem is just that the new stuff is being “saved for special.”

There used to be a path along the near wall. The walker couldn’t get INTO the room

We are repeatedly invoking the mantra “Use the stuff!  If you don’t use it, then toss it.”  We’re at the point  where the hospital bed is ready to install and the white gloves come off.  We’ve spent the last weekend cleaning, decluttering and tossing.  The whirlwind also included putting in new faucets in all the sinks (to stop the dripping).

It’s been a little distressing, a little disgusting, and required a lot of patience.  The end result is that Mom can actually take her walker into any room in the house.  Furniture has been moved and cleaned behind and under that had been collecting dust for 20 years.  There is still a lot to do, but this is a good stopping point.

This room has always been a problem.

Here’s the after. Andrea is justifiably proud. Dad is a little unnerved.

There is a lot of disorientation, especially on Mom’s part.  It will take her some time to get used to the space.  Dad has to touch everything that’s been put away and make sure that his most precious memorabilia is where he can get his hands on it at a whim.  I’m sure in a couple of weeks piles will begin to accumulate again.  Better is still better.

Mom is pretty happy. There’s actually a workable pathway out the door!

Thanks to my sister Andrea, her husband Butch, her son Zac and his SO Darcy, and Andrea’s daughter Alyx (who spent the weekend scrubbing).   I couldn’t have touched this job and they took the lead on all of it.  I’m thankful to be able to help at all.  5 years ago, I couldn’t have done anything.

Our culture has lost track of the sacredness of caring for our elders.  We don’t have the time, services, support or even the examples of how to handle this.  We are trying to do this work from a distance.  3 hours is no distance from my parents compared to what many of my friends deal with.   Very few of us anymore have the resources to take our aging parents into our homes.  We do what we can, and are grateful for the opportunity.

Cabin Fever

My indoor plants are trying to be hopeful

I’m tired of snow.  So is everyone else.  There’s a whole lot of grumpy going on.

This last batch I’m sure many people just left to melt.  Indeed, the parts I didn’t shovel are pretty much cleared with the day’s sunshine.  Unfortunately I couldn’t just ignore it.  Orion’s transportation depends on a clear path from the road to the house.  Pushing the wheelchair in even 1″ of snow is a whole different chore.

I have a huge blister on my palm.  It’s from a sugar burn I got last Thursday.  I’ve been fortunate that I haven’t broken it yet, but it is a challenge.  It made shoveling especially exciting this morning.

My Facebook feed is filling up with photos of blooms.  Even here people have their seeds started indoors and there are pretty little sprouts peaking up.  Not me.  I can’t even bring myself to look through the garden catalogs.

I tried picking up some tulips.  The “happy flowers” helped for a day or two.  I tried a fire in the fireplace.  That was great until I ran out of inside wood and couldn’t bring myself to trudge through the snow to unbury more.  I tried baking (see above sugar burn).  Even getting deep into a good book is difficult.

I’m antsy.  I have spring fever.  I want to open the windows.  I want some light.  Instead I’m curled up in a sweater with a cup of hot tea scrolling through re-runs.

What’s your cure for cabin fever?

It’s a Musical

more snow is in the forecast (and in my bones)

Snow is coming in yet again.  Not unseasonable for us here in the “cold north”.  That doesn’t make it anymore pleasant when I’m stiff from shoveling and gazing longingly at the gardening catalogs filling my mailbox.  I need to get in the car and run errands before the storm hits.

Orion and I listen to Sirius XM Broadway station whenever we’re in the car together.  It’s the station we can agree on.  We both enjoy musicals, and the Broadway repertoire includes music from every genre imaginable.

Orion is also big on filking.  He has a talent for making up lyrics on the fly.  He says, “If I was singing that song I wouldn’t sing it that way….”  and goes on to demonstrate for me.   He has some favorites.  Instead of “I Could Have Danced All Night” he sings a song about being in the hospital with the catch “I Could Have Slept All Night” (if only I wasn’t woken up every 5 minutes by an alarm, a nurse, or someone wanting to stick my arm….).

The Chanhassen was kind enough to post an article about the actual history

Because of our shared appreciation for show tunes, Orion’s birthday present to me was a trip to the Chanhassen Dinner Theater to see Newsies.   We got to go this weekend.  It’s a show set at the turn of the century (not this one, but the last one) in NYC.  The children of the city are working in sweatshops and on the streets.  One of the jobs is hawking the day’s papers.  When the big publishers decide to unexpectedly jack up the prices of the papers for the Newsies the kids decide to start a union and strike.

It’s a Disney show, so the historical content isn’t accurate.  But it does reference historical events of the time.  The strike that provides inspiration for the musical was instrumental in the development of child labor laws and the beginning of the 20th century.

On Sunday we celebrated “Ham Day”, in that I made a ham and invited a friend over for dinner.  We also scheduled it so we could watch the Jesus Christ Superstar Live broadcast.  I’m a fan of the show.  I think it’s smart, musically brilliant, and generally fun.  This production was impressive.  It was well cast.  The vocal performances were balanced.Sara Bareilles gave the best performance I’ve ever seen of Mary Magdalene’s “I Don’t Know How to Love Him”.

A flight of Scotch, hand picked by Karina

Somewhere I also found time to spend with my daughter.  She spent most of the weekend setting up for the Easter Buffet at the pub where she works.   But she deigned to include me on her Salsa dancing night.  I had a good time, and even danced a little.  I had more fun watching her.  She shines in a crowd and really loves to dance to the Latin rhythms.

Looking for trouble?

Equinox

I didn’t post a blog last week.  I had plenty to write about.  I had photos. I theoretically had time.   I just spent that time in bed recovering from being all peopled out.  It was a busy week, and last week was as well.

Going through the equinox reminded me that this is all about balance.   I’ve written about balance quite a bit.  There is always something new for me to learn.  I recognize balance is not a passive thing.  I also recognize that it’s harder to maintain balance when the swing back and forth is very wide.  My swing has been a little wide.

old friends

In my busy people weekend I had a great time.  It turned into a weekend all about live music, what a treat!  I ran into an old friend on-line.  (Or as I like to remind her: I’m not her oldest friend; I’m just the one she’s known the longest.)  Since I hate trying to have a real conversation through messaging (is my age showing) I asked what she was up to and if we could get together.  She had plans with another of our High School friends and invited me to tag along.   Music in the suburbs, good company – including the strangers who graciously shared their table, old fashioned rock-a-billy music and a lot of catching up.

Paganicon!

Then the weekend got into full swing with both St. Patrick’s Day and Paganicon.    This is Karina’s first St. Pat’s as a manager in an Irish Pub.   I got several phone calls including the stories of all the “fires” that she needed to deal with.  The folks I talked to when I stopped in this week had nothing but praise for her, so I suspect she rocked it.  She had scheduled events at the pub all week.  I went on Friday (St. Practice day) to hear Hustle Rose.

The band leader worked with Karina back in the day, so I’d met him and heard the band before.  It was nice to support them both.  I think they are very talented and I like their original stuff as well as their covers.  David, the band leader, was even kind enough to give slightly intoxicated Mom, me, a ride home.

“St. Practice Day” at Claddaugh with Hustle Rose

Part of the Paganicon line-up are the musical guests.  Because I took Orion this year we were much more focused on the socializing than the workshops.  Of course one of the best places to get together with folks is around the music.  Saturday night is the ball, and another friend Tomi T-Time Majoros and his band stepped in when the scheduled band backed out.  Even the musical guest of honor S.J. Tucker sang along.  It was great to have a ball band that folks could dance too.  A fun and friendly evening.

Orion and I also got to hear S.J and visit a little with her.  She put out a special edition exclusive CD just for the Paganicon event.  Her heart is as great as her voice.

Sweet of SJ to sign the CD for Orion

This last weekend, as I said, was the equinox which meant ritual prep and execution.  I also ran up to my folks for 24 hours (that’s 3 hours up and 3 hours back for an overnight).  Dad wanted to caucus,  my sister needed to do an equipment run (a hospital bed and a wheelchair coming soon for my Mom) and so someone needed to stay.  Glad to be able to help even if it meant swinging that balance a little wide.

 

To check out my previous posts search on my blog page for:

Balance

Equinox

Ostara

Paganicon

Losing Time

Photo by Gianna Olson (one of our group this weekend)

Daylight Savings time is hard on the body, especially in the spring.  I spent much of the weekend indulging my own body clock.  That was great, but since I’m more of a night owl, it made the spring forward adjustment even more difficult.

I am doing better than I expected under the circumstances.  I attribute that to taking some time out for a Sauna.

Sauna is a social/spiritual/cultural event.  There are sauna/sweat practices in many northern cultural traditions.  In the Twin Cities there is actually a club, the 612 Sauna Society that was founded to explore and share the Norse sauna traditions.

The 612 Sauna Society sets up their portable sauna

This month they’ve set up in the courtyard of the Swedish Institute.  A good friend decided she’d like to try sauna (she’d never done one) and I got an invite.  I chose to see this as a continuation of my birthday celebrations.  Especially after last week’s snowstorm I’ve seen lots of people succumbing to the “is winter ever going to be over blues”.  Part of the reason I maintain the “older you are longer you get to celebrate” philosophy is to combat that.

It was a perfect day to spend the afternoon sweating.  In a Scandinavian setting sauna is usually done in cycles.   You warm up to the core and then come out into the cold and cool all the way down.  The “rinse repeat” can mean coming out of the sauna and jumping into the snow or a cold lake,  doing a cold water splash, or just hanging out.  We did three rounds, and mostly skipped the “rinse” part of the program, although it was certainly an option.

Inside is inviting and peaceful

The 612 volunteers actually recommended a slower cool down.  The quick splash, or even a brisk breeze at colder temperatures, can make you feel ready to return to the sauna before the core has really cooled.  We drank a lot of water and cooled off by the fire.   Being outside in swimsuits at 30 degrees Fahrenheit was quite sufficient, and quite pleasant.

The time in the sauna was social, but it wasn’t small talk.  In many ways the sharing was as much a release of toxins as the actual sweat.  There wasn’t a “timer” we were told to listen to our bodies and come out and go in as we would tolerate it.  We brought water bottles and the 612 Sauna Society provided water for refills so we were very conscientious about staying hydrated throughout the experience.

Refreshing to be in a swimsuit in the snow

It was a time without time.  It was a ritual without a lot of ritual.  It was an opportunity to learn more about the cultural history of sauna and about each other.  It was an opportunity to get in touch and in tune with my own body rhythms.  It was cleansing and healing.  It was delightful.

Even better is that I can tell the cleansing and healing effects have stayed with me.  My desire for just water continues to be high.  My appetite is good, but not overwhelming.  My aches and pains have eased up considerably.  I slept really well.  I’m still grumpy about the time though.  It shouldn’t be this late yet!

 

Previous, perhaps relevant, blogs:

Daylight Savings

My first Daylight Savings post

It’s not the first time I’ve been to the Swedish Institute in birthday season

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